Mad Hot Ballroom

Posted on Categories HOPE Reporter: Kidd O'Shea | WISN-TV Channel 12 (ABC)

HOPE takes home 10 trophies

Ms. Megan Huff introduced the classes of 2015 and 2016
(5th and 6th grade) to ballroom dancing this year with Ms. Rachel Payden, a Danceworks’ dance instructor. The students enjoyed it so much that they asked to have extra practices following after-school tutoring.

“HOPE’s arts program exposes students to new experiences that are designed to expand their horizons and enrich their lives – like ballroom dancing,” Ms. Huff said. “I’ve enjoyed seeing my students blossom into young ladies and gentleman as they learn the social skills that are part of ballroom dancing.”

After 12 weeks of lessons, the students entered Danceworks’ Mad Hot Ballroom competition for the first time, along with 934 students from Milwaukee’s private and public schools. HOPE went home with 10 awards, including “Overall Ballroom Champions,” proving once again that hard work pays off.

“At HOPE, we believe that teaching and learning should be exciting,” said Principal Patrick Hurley. “Watching the students respond to ballroom dancing has been extremely rewarding.

“I got a call at 4 a.m. from one student the day of the competition because she wanted to remind us to give her a ride,” Mr. Hurley said. “That’s the kind of passion we like to see at HOPE, but next time I’ll ask students not to call before 5 a.m.”

View Pictures

 

HOPE took home 10 awards:

  • “Overall Ballroom Champions”
  • Swing: 1st and 2nd place
  • Tango: 2nd place
  • Salsa: 1st, 3rd and 7th place
  • “Above and Beyond” recognized HOPE and two other schools for exceeding the requirements of the program
  • Ms. Megan Huff received the “Golden Apple,” which honors three outstanding teachers
  • HOPE won the “Spirit” award, which honors the three schools with the best cheering section and school spirit

Close ×

What is Greater Purpose?

We chose the name “Open Sky Education” for a reason. We believe that we all do better work when we’re looking up.

Looking up often leads to the discovery of a cause or context that is greater than yourself. One that inspires you to serve selflessly and leads to more fulfilling work.

We refer to this as “Greater Purpose.” It’s what inspires our work in the classroom, in the board room, and in communities we serve. With this perspective, we can be true serving leaders, advancing ideas that are bigger than us, for the benefit of others.